Gothic Art 13th – 14th century

  • © ATOUT FRANCE/CRT Picardie/Sam Bellet

  • © ATOUT FRANCE/Philippe Maille

Gothic Art 13th – 14th century

Gothic architecture features rib vaulting and is distinctive for its use of the pointed arch.  It is a statement of a determination to open one space into another.  The height of apses, the numerous windows and light of stained glass increases the sense of space, reinforced by pointed arches, rib vaulted ceilings and flying buttresses.  The chancel of Beauvais cathedral rises to a height of 48 m.  Chartres cathedral is an object of wonder with its stained glass windows, scupltures and carvings.  Reliquaries were covered in enamel and precious metals. Altarpieces and statues are designed to look austere. 
In the North and Centre regions of France, Notre-Dame de Paris and its magnificent towers, Noyon (Oise), Sens (Yonne), Laon (Aisne), Reims (Marne), Amiens (Somme) Mantes (Yvelines), Chartres (Eure-et-Loir), Beauvais (Oise), Bourges (Cher) and Saint-Denis (Seine-Saint-Denis) are some of the finest examples of these cathedrals constructed from the 13th century, soaring mystically into the air, they are a real miracle of faith and of the cathedral builders.Late Gothic would become "flamboyant" in the 15th century, with corrugated ornamentation.  Gothic came back into fashion in the late 19th century as neo-Gothic, influenced by the architect Viollet-le-Duc.
Originating in the Ile-de-France [the area around Paris], Gothic art was to unify religious works of art in Christian Western Europe from the mid 13th century.