Destination the Mediterranean coast

  • © OT Languedoc Roussillon

  • Béziers

    Béziers

    © Atout France / Phovoir

  • Camargue

    Camargue

    © Atout France / Phovoir

  • Calanques of Marseille

    Calanques of Marseille

    © Atout France / Phovoir

  • Old Harbour Marseille

    Old Harbour Marseille

    © Atout France / Phovoir

  • Notre Dame de la Garde

    Notre Dame de la Garde

    © Atout France / Phovoir

  • Saintes Marie de la Mer

    Saintes Marie de la Mer

    © Atout France / Phovoir

  • Cannes

    Cannes

    © Atout France / Phovoir

  • Antibes Juan les Pins

    Antibes Juan les Pins

    © Atout France / Phovoir

Destination the Mediterranean coast

The Mediterranean coast runs for 901km across southern France. From the Pyrenees to the Alps, from Spain to Italy, it offers a range of stunning landscapes drawing tourists from around the world.

 

The Languedoc-Roussillon coast runs from the Pyrenees to the Camargue.

At the Spanish border, the Pyrenees run down into the Golf du Lion at the wild and rocky Côte de Vermeille or “Vermillion Coast”, a paradise for walkers and divers alike.

The shoreline then levels out along the Amethyst Coast between Perpignan and Montpellier, taking in the towns of Narbonne and Béziers and providing an abundance of sandy beaches ideal for swimming and sunbathing.

The beaches of Languedoc-Roussillon also offer a number of recognised kite-surfing spots.

 

The Camargue

Straddling the Rhône delta lies the wild and unspoilt coast of the Camargue.

One of France’s National Natural Parks, the Camargue is a botanical and zoological reserve that houses a great diversity of bird species, though it is perhaps best known for its pink flamingos and wild horses.

 

The Provencal coast and the Côte d'Azur

To the east of the Camargue lies Provence.

Nearby, the warm and welcoming city of Marseille – the second largest in France – is well worth a detour for its history, the Basilica of Notre-Dame de la Garde and the old port.

Leaving Marseille, Cassis and its famed calanques or coastal creeks offer a natural landscape of breathtaking beauty.

 

At the eastern edge lies the French Riviera, the coastline of Var and the Côte d'Azur, home to some of France’s most glamorous resorts frequented by jet-setting tourists from around the world.

Over the years, a host of seaside resorts have grown up from the Mediterranean to the Alps, from Toulon to the Italian border, including Saint-Tropez, Le Lavandou, Fréjus-Saint-Raphaël, Juan-les-Pins and, of course, Cannes and Nice, to name but a few.